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Battle on the High Seas II Tournament Report

Posted by : DM101 on Monday, March 30, 2009 permalink
Battle on the High Seas II Tournament Report

Main Event

32 runners anted-up the $300+$30 main event, with many notable poker players making their first appearance onboard the Long Jie. Battle on the High Seas I champion Erique Tan was back to defend his title, and he kicked off the tournament by announcing ‘Dealers, Shuffle up and Deal!’

The tournament structure was amended from the previous event, with all players given starting stacks of 100 big blinds. In spite of that however, the first level saw the elimination of 4 players, three of whom had wandered over from the Baccarat and Si Ki Pi pits, and who had registered out of curiosity. Long Jie favourite Chris Chong was also unfortunately eliminated when he ran pocket queens into pocket aces in his first hand.

Play moved along steadily, and tournament director Ivan Tan kept everyone entertained by providing commentary each time a player moved all-in and found a caller. With 6 places paid and everyone keen to make the money spots, play tightened up considerably when the tournament came down to its final 12 players. At approximately 4am, the final table of 9 was decided. Tournament director Ivan Tan determined - with the consent of the players - that play would continue until the tournament reached its final 6.



Main Event - Final 9 Players

The action at the final table was cautious and tentative. Having come this far, no one seemed keen to get involved in a pot that would cost them a money spot. The aggressive and talented Philip Tan had played a fantastic tournament, and, short-stacked, found himself in the big blind with AA. Erique Tan put him in all-in from the button with 55, and Philip snap-called. Unfortunately for Philip, a 5 on the flop gave Erique the pot, and eliminated him from the tournament. Next to go was Adrian Ang, whose less than 1 big blind stack was consumed by Francis Leo, after his all-in preflop A5 failed to hold.

Money bubble play was extremely tense, with 3 players on extremely short stacks. The bubble finally burst when Erique, once again, put the short stacked Goh Wei Yang to a decision for all his chips. After tanking, Wei Yang finally made the call with J8 off-suit, while Erique flipped over Q7, to a chorus of ‘Live cards live cards!’ from the fairly large group of onlookers. The 4h 7s 10h 3d Qd board made 2-pair for the defending champion, and eliminated Wei Yang in 7th position.

The final 6 players took their seats the next day at 1230pm. Here are the chip counts at the commencement of play.

Main Event Final 6:

Seat 1 – Zhang Kai Xiang – 41800
Seat 2 – Stephen Ng – 700
Seat 3 – Terry Tay – 7300
Seat 4 – Erique Tan – 75600
Seat 5 – Ernest Guo – 7000
Seat 6 - Francis Leo - 48800

Stephen Ng was the first player eliminated. Stephen impressed many with his solid, aggressive play through the tournament, winning many uncontested pots and picking off bluffs. Starting the final day off in the small blind, Stephen had all his remaining chips posted, with his K7 failing to outrun 24. Stephen picked up $550 for his efforts. Terry Tay was next to fall, when his short-stacked shove with AQ in the cut off called by the pocket sevens of Francis Leo in the big blind. Terry’s AQ got no help from the board, and he finished 5th, taking home $770. The other short stack at the table, the very resilient Ernest Guo, took his stand with JQ several hands later. One of the bigger stacks had no trouble making the call for a few more yellow chips, flipping over 10 6. The board of Ax 10x 6x 2x Ax eliminated Ernest in 4th place, awarding him a tidy $970 payday.

The increasingly large jump in prize money from spot to spot put some pressure on the players, who began three-handed play cautiously. Play consisted of raised blinds and quick folds, with most of the pots going uncontested. Approximately 20 hands later, Francis limped from the small blind into Zhang Kai Xiang’s big blind, and Kai Xiang checked. Both players took a flop of 7d 2d 5s. Francis checked, and Kai Xiang led out, while Francis made a quick call. The turn brought the 5d, and Francis went all-in, sending Kai Xiang into the tank. After some deliberation, Kai Xiang made the call with 6s6c, while Francis turned over Kd 7s. The river 3 was no help to either player, and Kai Xiang took with him 3rd spot and $1260 in prize money.

Heads-up play lasted for approximate half an hour, with Erique and Francis trading chips back and forth. Francis had come to heads-up play with a 2-1 chip lead, which was slowly eroded by the more experienced Erique, who seemed to be picking up an endless series of small pots. The last hand of the tournament saw both players getting all their money in pre-flop. Erique turned over AQ, while Francis showed A7, needing to hit one of his three outs to stay alive. Neither player connected with the board, and Francis was eliminated in 2nd place, taking away with him a very decent prize of $2110.

With that, Erique ‘The Bullet Dodger’ Tan was crowned Champion of the Battle of the High Seas II main event, scooping $3910 and making it back to back victories for the extremely skilled and likeable man. When asked for his comments, Erique said, ‘This has been a great venue for me, and I always enjoy playing here. I’ll definitely be back for the next tournament’.



Defending Champion - Erique Tan

The $100 NLHE Rebuy

26 players took their seats for this exciting side event on Saturday 2pm. Here are the prizes and payouts:



Rebuy Tourney - Final 9 players

1) Dylan Tan – $3570
2) Vincent Koh - $2125
3) Neo T H - $1275
4) Erique Tan - $850
5) We didn’t get your name so please contact us if you read this - $680


Pokerkaki.com congratulates all winners, and thanks all of the kakis who supported the events. Special thanks go out to Ivan Tan, who ran both tournaments with efficiency and professionalism. Check back soon for details of next month’s events!

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